ACCRA [dot] ALT
Dope music. Fresh art. Brave indie cultures. Subversively African
ACCRA [dot] ALT
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ourafrica:

We were recently mesmerized by these bank notes from Central African Republic. We thought we’d share the notes for some print design inspiration. The notes are unique and creative with strong elements of design and use of colors providing a unique look into Central African Republic’s cultural identity. Enjoy.
Via: African Digital Art
ourafrica:

We were recently mesmerized by these bank notes from Central African Republic. We thought we’d share the notes for some print design inspiration. The notes are unique and creative with strong elements of design and use of colors providing a unique look into Central African Republic’s cultural identity. Enjoy.
Via: African Digital Art
ourafrica:

We were recently mesmerized by these bank notes from Central African Republic. We thought we’d share the notes for some print design inspiration. The notes are unique and creative with strong elements of design and use of colors providing a unique look into Central African Republic’s cultural identity. Enjoy.
Via: African Digital Art
ourafrica:

We were recently mesmerized by these bank notes from Central African Republic. We thought we’d share the notes for some print design inspiration. The notes are unique and creative with strong elements of design and use of colors providing a unique look into Central African Republic’s cultural identity. Enjoy.
Via: African Digital Art
ourafrica:

We were recently mesmerized by these bank notes from Central African Republic. We thought we’d share the notes for some print design inspiration. The notes are unique and creative with strong elements of design and use of colors providing a unique look into Central African Republic’s cultural identity. Enjoy.
Via: African Digital Art
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dynastylnoire:

yagazieemezi:

Hidden Magic: Katlego Kgabale
As kids, we grew up with our imagination running wild though our minds. As least I did! I would spend hours bent over a book, flipping recklessly through pages for words and images to feed my daydreams. Kgabale illustrated work offers up little brown girl dreams that I would have loved to come across as a child. But even as an adult, I can still appreciate and admire the creativity behind each piece.
View more
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

OMG THIS IS AWESOME!
dynastylnoire:

yagazieemezi:

Hidden Magic: Katlego Kgabale
As kids, we grew up with our imagination running wild though our minds. As least I did! I would spend hours bent over a book, flipping recklessly through pages for words and images to feed my daydreams. Kgabale illustrated work offers up little brown girl dreams that I would have loved to come across as a child. But even as an adult, I can still appreciate and admire the creativity behind each piece.
View more
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

OMG THIS IS AWESOME!
dynastylnoire:

yagazieemezi:

Hidden Magic: Katlego Kgabale
As kids, we grew up with our imagination running wild though our minds. As least I did! I would spend hours bent over a book, flipping recklessly through pages for words and images to feed my daydreams. Kgabale illustrated work offers up little brown girl dreams that I would have loved to come across as a child. But even as an adult, I can still appreciate and admire the creativity behind each piece.
View more
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

OMG THIS IS AWESOME!
dynastylnoire:

yagazieemezi:

Hidden Magic: Katlego Kgabale
As kids, we grew up with our imagination running wild though our minds. As least I did! I would spend hours bent over a book, flipping recklessly through pages for words and images to feed my daydreams. Kgabale illustrated work offers up little brown girl dreams that I would have loved to come across as a child. But even as an adult, I can still appreciate and admire the creativity behind each piece.
View more
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

OMG THIS IS AWESOME!
dynastylnoire:

yagazieemezi:

Hidden Magic: Katlego Kgabale
As kids, we grew up with our imagination running wild though our minds. As least I did! I would spend hours bent over a book, flipping recklessly through pages for words and images to feed my daydreams. Kgabale illustrated work offers up little brown girl dreams that I would have loved to come across as a child. But even as an adult, I can still appreciate and admire the creativity behind each piece.
View more
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

OMG THIS IS AWESOME!
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medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
Tamara Natalie Madden
Madden lists among influences Gustav Klimt and images of Egyptian royalty. You can view many, many more images of her work here at her official website.
I find these breathtaking acrylic and mixed media paintings evocative of both the Fayum Mummy Portraits and early medieval icons featuring the Black Madonna.
medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
Tamara Natalie Madden
Madden lists among influences Gustav Klimt and images of Egyptian royalty. You can view many, many more images of her work here at her official website.
I find these breathtaking acrylic and mixed media paintings evocative of both the Fayum Mummy Portraits and early medieval icons featuring the Black Madonna.
medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
Tamara Natalie Madden
Madden lists among influences Gustav Klimt and images of Egyptian royalty. You can view many, many more images of her work here at her official website.
I find these breathtaking acrylic and mixed media paintings evocative of both the Fayum Mummy Portraits and early medieval icons featuring the Black Madonna.
medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
Tamara Natalie Madden
Madden lists among influences Gustav Klimt and images of Egyptian royalty. You can view many, many more images of her work here at her official website.
I find these breathtaking acrylic and mixed media paintings evocative of both the Fayum Mummy Portraits and early medieval icons featuring the Black Madonna.
medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
Tamara Natalie Madden
Madden lists among influences Gustav Klimt and images of Egyptian royalty. You can view many, many more images of her work here at her official website.
I find these breathtaking acrylic and mixed media paintings evocative of both the Fayum Mummy Portraits and early medieval icons featuring the Black Madonna.
medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
Tamara Natalie Madden
Madden lists among influences Gustav Klimt and images of Egyptian royalty. You can view many, many more images of her work here at her official website.
I find these breathtaking acrylic and mixed media paintings evocative of both the Fayum Mummy Portraits and early medieval icons featuring the Black Madonna.
medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
Tamara Natalie Madden
Madden lists among influences Gustav Klimt and images of Egyptian royalty. You can view many, many more images of her work here at her official website.
I find these breathtaking acrylic and mixed media paintings evocative of both the Fayum Mummy Portraits and early medieval icons featuring the Black Madonna.
medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
Tamara Natalie Madden
Madden lists among influences Gustav Klimt and images of Egyptian royalty. You can view many, many more images of her work here at her official website.
I find these breathtaking acrylic and mixed media paintings evocative of both the Fayum Mummy Portraits and early medieval icons featuring the Black Madonna.
medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
Tamara Natalie Madden
Madden lists among influences Gustav Klimt and images of Egyptian royalty. You can view many, many more images of her work here at her official website.
I find these breathtaking acrylic and mixed media paintings evocative of both the Fayum Mummy Portraits and early medieval icons featuring the Black Madonna.
medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
Tamara Natalie Madden
Madden lists among influences Gustav Klimt and images of Egyptian royalty. You can view many, many more images of her work here at her official website.
I find these breathtaking acrylic and mixed media paintings evocative of both the Fayum Mummy Portraits and early medieval icons featuring the Black Madonna.
Adun's dish: African dishes with a twist.
My chosen homelands :Sudan
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We need a trip to Ethiopia with our christian friends in Ghana to learn about coptic images that show black folk as biblical characters.
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accrawalkintours:

   James Town is located to the east of the Korle lagoon, a neighbourhood in the inner-city of Accra. It is a densely populated community with low-rise buildings and small scale businesses thread on the streets along the Coastline. James Town has a larger population of Ga people who are conventionally fishermen.

Boxing is also a serious deal in James Town. Bukom, a suburb of James Town is well noted for the role it plays in churning out world champions in boxing. The murals of boxers on the walls in this community easily communicates to people that they are in a boxing zone once they are in Bukom.  Ghana’s boxing history is traced back to James Town, and can also boast as the only community in the world that has more than 20 boxing gyms. It has over the past 75 years continue to put Ghana on the world map by nurturing world champions like Joshua ‘The Hitter’ Clottey, Ike ‘Bazooka’ Quartey and Azumah ‘The Professor’ Nelson and more. James Town is undoubtedly the Capital of African boxing.
    This makes one understand why people would enthusiastically come out onto the street to see street boxing every weekend. kids between the ages of 6 and 12 take turns to fight each other. No matter the level of boxing, professional rules are applied any day. People watching the game sometimes voluntarily coach these kids.
Street boxing is seen to be a part of the people of James Town (both old and young), and so Accra [dot] Alt, producers of the annual CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival in James Town included the sport in their activities for the 2013 edition. People stood amidst heavy rains to enjoy some imaginative street boxing brewed on the streets of James Town. 

An amazing part of the whole boxing business in James Town is that it is no gender biased. Females are also involved in street boxing. The young girls in James Town also test their boxing skills by taking on the guys in street boxing. As young as 11 year olds fight their fellow males in these boxing games.
 







 







Anytime you are Accra, specifically James Town, take time to watch and support these young street fighters, you just might be seeing a world champion.

 

 
accrawalkintours:

   James Town is located to the east of the Korle lagoon, a neighbourhood in the inner-city of Accra. It is a densely populated community with low-rise buildings and small scale businesses thread on the streets along the Coastline. James Town has a larger population of Ga people who are conventionally fishermen.

Boxing is also a serious deal in James Town. Bukom, a suburb of James Town is well noted for the role it plays in churning out world champions in boxing. The murals of boxers on the walls in this community easily communicates to people that they are in a boxing zone once they are in Bukom.  Ghana’s boxing history is traced back to James Town, and can also boast as the only community in the world that has more than 20 boxing gyms. It has over the past 75 years continue to put Ghana on the world map by nurturing world champions like Joshua ‘The Hitter’ Clottey, Ike ‘Bazooka’ Quartey and Azumah ‘The Professor’ Nelson and more. James Town is undoubtedly the Capital of African boxing.
    This makes one understand why people would enthusiastically come out onto the street to see street boxing every weekend. kids between the ages of 6 and 12 take turns to fight each other. No matter the level of boxing, professional rules are applied any day. People watching the game sometimes voluntarily coach these kids.
Street boxing is seen to be a part of the people of James Town (both old and young), and so Accra [dot] Alt, producers of the annual CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival in James Town included the sport in their activities for the 2013 edition. People stood amidst heavy rains to enjoy some imaginative street boxing brewed on the streets of James Town. 

An amazing part of the whole boxing business in James Town is that it is no gender biased. Females are also involved in street boxing. The young girls in James Town also test their boxing skills by taking on the guys in street boxing. As young as 11 year olds fight their fellow males in these boxing games.
 







 







Anytime you are Accra, specifically James Town, take time to watch and support these young street fighters, you just might be seeing a world champion.

 

 
accrawalkintours:

   James Town is located to the east of the Korle lagoon, a neighbourhood in the inner-city of Accra. It is a densely populated community with low-rise buildings and small scale businesses thread on the streets along the Coastline. James Town has a larger population of Ga people who are conventionally fishermen.

Boxing is also a serious deal in James Town. Bukom, a suburb of James Town is well noted for the role it plays in churning out world champions in boxing. The murals of boxers on the walls in this community easily communicates to people that they are in a boxing zone once they are in Bukom.  Ghana’s boxing history is traced back to James Town, and can also boast as the only community in the world that has more than 20 boxing gyms. It has over the past 75 years continue to put Ghana on the world map by nurturing world champions like Joshua ‘The Hitter’ Clottey, Ike ‘Bazooka’ Quartey and Azumah ‘The Professor’ Nelson and more. James Town is undoubtedly the Capital of African boxing.
    This makes one understand why people would enthusiastically come out onto the street to see street boxing every weekend. kids between the ages of 6 and 12 take turns to fight each other. No matter the level of boxing, professional rules are applied any day. People watching the game sometimes voluntarily coach these kids.
Street boxing is seen to be a part of the people of James Town (both old and young), and so Accra [dot] Alt, producers of the annual CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival in James Town included the sport in their activities for the 2013 edition. People stood amidst heavy rains to enjoy some imaginative street boxing brewed on the streets of James Town. 

An amazing part of the whole boxing business in James Town is that it is no gender biased. Females are also involved in street boxing. The young girls in James Town also test their boxing skills by taking on the guys in street boxing. As young as 11 year olds fight their fellow males in these boxing games.
 







 







Anytime you are Accra, specifically James Town, take time to watch and support these young street fighters, you just might be seeing a world champion.

 

 
accrawalkintours:

   James Town is located to the east of the Korle lagoon, a neighbourhood in the inner-city of Accra. It is a densely populated community with low-rise buildings and small scale businesses thread on the streets along the Coastline. James Town has a larger population of Ga people who are conventionally fishermen.

Boxing is also a serious deal in James Town. Bukom, a suburb of James Town is well noted for the role it plays in churning out world champions in boxing. The murals of boxers on the walls in this community easily communicates to people that they are in a boxing zone once they are in Bukom.  Ghana’s boxing history is traced back to James Town, and can also boast as the only community in the world that has more than 20 boxing gyms. It has over the past 75 years continue to put Ghana on the world map by nurturing world champions like Joshua ‘The Hitter’ Clottey, Ike ‘Bazooka’ Quartey and Azumah ‘The Professor’ Nelson and more. James Town is undoubtedly the Capital of African boxing.
    This makes one understand why people would enthusiastically come out onto the street to see street boxing every weekend. kids between the ages of 6 and 12 take turns to fight each other. No matter the level of boxing, professional rules are applied any day. People watching the game sometimes voluntarily coach these kids.
Street boxing is seen to be a part of the people of James Town (both old and young), and so Accra [dot] Alt, producers of the annual CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival in James Town included the sport in their activities for the 2013 edition. People stood amidst heavy rains to enjoy some imaginative street boxing brewed on the streets of James Town. 

An amazing part of the whole boxing business in James Town is that it is no gender biased. Females are also involved in street boxing. The young girls in James Town also test their boxing skills by taking on the guys in street boxing. As young as 11 year olds fight their fellow males in these boxing games.
 







 







Anytime you are Accra, specifically James Town, take time to watch and support these young street fighters, you just might be seeing a world champion.

 

 
accrawalkintours:

   James Town is located to the east of the Korle lagoon, a neighbourhood in the inner-city of Accra. It is a densely populated community with low-rise buildings and small scale businesses thread on the streets along the Coastline. James Town has a larger population of Ga people who are conventionally fishermen.

Boxing is also a serious deal in James Town. Bukom, a suburb of James Town is well noted for the role it plays in churning out world champions in boxing. The murals of boxers on the walls in this community easily communicates to people that they are in a boxing zone once they are in Bukom.  Ghana’s boxing history is traced back to James Town, and can also boast as the only community in the world that has more than 20 boxing gyms. It has over the past 75 years continue to put Ghana on the world map by nurturing world champions like Joshua ‘The Hitter’ Clottey, Ike ‘Bazooka’ Quartey and Azumah ‘The Professor’ Nelson and more. James Town is undoubtedly the Capital of African boxing.
    This makes one understand why people would enthusiastically come out onto the street to see street boxing every weekend. kids between the ages of 6 and 12 take turns to fight each other. No matter the level of boxing, professional rules are applied any day. People watching the game sometimes voluntarily coach these kids.
Street boxing is seen to be a part of the people of James Town (both old and young), and so Accra [dot] Alt, producers of the annual CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival in James Town included the sport in their activities for the 2013 edition. People stood amidst heavy rains to enjoy some imaginative street boxing brewed on the streets of James Town. 

An amazing part of the whole boxing business in James Town is that it is no gender biased. Females are also involved in street boxing. The young girls in James Town also test their boxing skills by taking on the guys in street boxing. As young as 11 year olds fight their fellow males in these boxing games.
 







 







Anytime you are Accra, specifically James Town, take time to watch and support these young street fighters, you just might be seeing a world champion.

 

 
accrawalkintours:

   James Town is located to the east of the Korle lagoon, a neighbourhood in the inner-city of Accra. It is a densely populated community with low-rise buildings and small scale businesses thread on the streets along the Coastline. James Town has a larger population of Ga people who are conventionally fishermen.

Boxing is also a serious deal in James Town. Bukom, a suburb of James Town is well noted for the role it plays in churning out world champions in boxing. The murals of boxers on the walls in this community easily communicates to people that they are in a boxing zone once they are in Bukom.  Ghana’s boxing history is traced back to James Town, and can also boast as the only community in the world that has more than 20 boxing gyms. It has over the past 75 years continue to put Ghana on the world map by nurturing world champions like Joshua ‘The Hitter’ Clottey, Ike ‘Bazooka’ Quartey and Azumah ‘The Professor’ Nelson and more. James Town is undoubtedly the Capital of African boxing.
    This makes one understand why people would enthusiastically come out onto the street to see street boxing every weekend. kids between the ages of 6 and 12 take turns to fight each other. No matter the level of boxing, professional rules are applied any day. People watching the game sometimes voluntarily coach these kids.
Street boxing is seen to be a part of the people of James Town (both old and young), and so Accra [dot] Alt, producers of the annual CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival in James Town included the sport in their activities for the 2013 edition. People stood amidst heavy rains to enjoy some imaginative street boxing brewed on the streets of James Town. 

An amazing part of the whole boxing business in James Town is that it is no gender biased. Females are also involved in street boxing. The young girls in James Town also test their boxing skills by taking on the guys in street boxing. As young as 11 year olds fight their fellow males in these boxing games.
 







 







Anytime you are Accra, specifically James Town, take time to watch and support these young street fighters, you just might be seeing a world champion.

 

 
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umxhosakazi:

SOUTH AFRICAN PAINTER AND PHOTOGRAPHER: ZWELETHU MTHETHWA 
Zwelethu Mthethwa 
Mthethwa was born in 1960 in Durban,Kwazulu Natal, South Africa. “His work is grounded in tradition, yet he imbues it with a riveting contemporary presence. He yanks the viewer through the looking-glass into his painterly planet. It is a world full of possible “windows”, yet these openings are flat surfaces soaked in subtly modulated fictions. And his paintings serve as visual songs, their lyrics narrating a story of how painting refers to itself while being fed by experiential nutrients. They serve both as parentheses within the real world and as vividly evocative vignettes of moments, intensely lived.”
- Hazel FriedmanBIOGRAPHY: 
Research Associate at Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT, 2000
Appointed Senior Lecturer, Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT,1998
Lecturer of Photography and Drawing at Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT 1994-98.
Customer Projects Coordinator for Truworths, 1991-93.
Master of Fine Arts in Imaging Art, Rochester Institute of Technology, USA, 1989
Assistant Coordinator Children´s Project for Community Arts Project, 1988-89
Cultural Organizer for Department of Education and Training, 1986-87
Advanced Diploma in Fine Arts, Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT,1 985
Diploma in Fine Arts, Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT, 1984
umxhosakazi:

SOUTH AFRICAN PAINTER AND PHOTOGRAPHER: ZWELETHU MTHETHWA 
Zwelethu Mthethwa 
Mthethwa was born in 1960 in Durban,Kwazulu Natal, South Africa. “His work is grounded in tradition, yet he imbues it with a riveting contemporary presence. He yanks the viewer through the looking-glass into his painterly planet. It is a world full of possible “windows”, yet these openings are flat surfaces soaked in subtly modulated fictions. And his paintings serve as visual songs, their lyrics narrating a story of how painting refers to itself while being fed by experiential nutrients. They serve both as parentheses within the real world and as vividly evocative vignettes of moments, intensely lived.”
- Hazel FriedmanBIOGRAPHY: 
Research Associate at Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT, 2000
Appointed Senior Lecturer, Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT,1998
Lecturer of Photography and Drawing at Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT 1994-98.
Customer Projects Coordinator for Truworths, 1991-93.
Master of Fine Arts in Imaging Art, Rochester Institute of Technology, USA, 1989
Assistant Coordinator Children´s Project for Community Arts Project, 1988-89
Cultural Organizer for Department of Education and Training, 1986-87
Advanced Diploma in Fine Arts, Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT,1 985
Diploma in Fine Arts, Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT, 1984
umxhosakazi:

SOUTH AFRICAN PAINTER AND PHOTOGRAPHER: ZWELETHU MTHETHWA 
Zwelethu Mthethwa 
Mthethwa was born in 1960 in Durban,Kwazulu Natal, South Africa. “His work is grounded in tradition, yet he imbues it with a riveting contemporary presence. He yanks the viewer through the looking-glass into his painterly planet. It is a world full of possible “windows”, yet these openings are flat surfaces soaked in subtly modulated fictions. And his paintings serve as visual songs, their lyrics narrating a story of how painting refers to itself while being fed by experiential nutrients. They serve both as parentheses within the real world and as vividly evocative vignettes of moments, intensely lived.”
- Hazel FriedmanBIOGRAPHY: 
Research Associate at Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT, 2000
Appointed Senior Lecturer, Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT,1998
Lecturer of Photography and Drawing at Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT 1994-98.
Customer Projects Coordinator for Truworths, 1991-93.
Master of Fine Arts in Imaging Art, Rochester Institute of Technology, USA, 1989
Assistant Coordinator Children´s Project for Community Arts Project, 1988-89
Cultural Organizer for Department of Education and Training, 1986-87
Advanced Diploma in Fine Arts, Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT,1 985
Diploma in Fine Arts, Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT, 1984
umxhosakazi:

SOUTH AFRICAN PAINTER AND PHOTOGRAPHER: ZWELETHU MTHETHWA 
Zwelethu Mthethwa 
Mthethwa was born in 1960 in Durban,Kwazulu Natal, South Africa. “His work is grounded in tradition, yet he imbues it with a riveting contemporary presence. He yanks the viewer through the looking-glass into his painterly planet. It is a world full of possible “windows”, yet these openings are flat surfaces soaked in subtly modulated fictions. And his paintings serve as visual songs, their lyrics narrating a story of how painting refers to itself while being fed by experiential nutrients. They serve both as parentheses within the real world and as vividly evocative vignettes of moments, intensely lived.”
- Hazel FriedmanBIOGRAPHY: 
Research Associate at Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT, 2000
Appointed Senior Lecturer, Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT,1998
Lecturer of Photography and Drawing at Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT 1994-98.
Customer Projects Coordinator for Truworths, 1991-93.
Master of Fine Arts in Imaging Art, Rochester Institute of Technology, USA, 1989
Assistant Coordinator Children´s Project for Community Arts Project, 1988-89
Cultural Organizer for Department of Education and Training, 1986-87
Advanced Diploma in Fine Arts, Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT,1 985
Diploma in Fine Arts, Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT, 1984
umxhosakazi:

SOUTH AFRICAN PAINTER AND PHOTOGRAPHER: ZWELETHU MTHETHWA 
Zwelethu Mthethwa 
Mthethwa was born in 1960 in Durban,Kwazulu Natal, South Africa. “His work is grounded in tradition, yet he imbues it with a riveting contemporary presence. He yanks the viewer through the looking-glass into his painterly planet. It is a world full of possible “windows”, yet these openings are flat surfaces soaked in subtly modulated fictions. And his paintings serve as visual songs, their lyrics narrating a story of how painting refers to itself while being fed by experiential nutrients. They serve both as parentheses within the real world and as vividly evocative vignettes of moments, intensely lived.”
- Hazel FriedmanBIOGRAPHY: 
Research Associate at Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT, 2000
Appointed Senior Lecturer, Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT,1998
Lecturer of Photography and Drawing at Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT 1994-98.
Customer Projects Coordinator for Truworths, 1991-93.
Master of Fine Arts in Imaging Art, Rochester Institute of Technology, USA, 1989
Assistant Coordinator Children´s Project for Community Arts Project, 1988-89
Cultural Organizer for Department of Education and Training, 1986-87
Advanced Diploma in Fine Arts, Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT,1 985
Diploma in Fine Arts, Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT, 1984
umxhosakazi:

SOUTH AFRICAN PAINTER AND PHOTOGRAPHER: ZWELETHU MTHETHWA 
Zwelethu Mthethwa 
Mthethwa was born in 1960 in Durban,Kwazulu Natal, South Africa. “His work is grounded in tradition, yet he imbues it with a riveting contemporary presence. He yanks the viewer through the looking-glass into his painterly planet. It is a world full of possible “windows”, yet these openings are flat surfaces soaked in subtly modulated fictions. And his paintings serve as visual songs, their lyrics narrating a story of how painting refers to itself while being fed by experiential nutrients. They serve both as parentheses within the real world and as vividly evocative vignettes of moments, intensely lived.”
- Hazel FriedmanBIOGRAPHY: 
Research Associate at Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT, 2000
Appointed Senior Lecturer, Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT,1998
Lecturer of Photography and Drawing at Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT 1994-98.
Customer Projects Coordinator for Truworths, 1991-93.
Master of Fine Arts in Imaging Art, Rochester Institute of Technology, USA, 1989
Assistant Coordinator Children´s Project for Community Arts Project, 1988-89
Cultural Organizer for Department of Education and Training, 1986-87
Advanced Diploma in Fine Arts, Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT,1 985
Diploma in Fine Arts, Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT, 1984
+
yagazieemezi:

Lost Wax Playing Cards
By Olutade Abidoye
Each set of Lost Wax Playing Cards contains 54 playing cards featuring illustrations of royal figures from the 15th – 19th century Benin Empire. The Benin Empire thrived in what is now southern Nigeria and left an impressive record of their civilization in the form of bronze plaques commissioned by the King (Oba) to adorn the courtyards of his palace. The playing cards pay homage to this prosperous period in Nigerian history and, in effect, bring this bygone era from the archives into modernity in a colorful and playful way.
"I expect Lost Wax Playing Cards to bring a new dynamism to Nigerian popular culture and consciousness. My aim is to rekindle this colorful, yet elusive history into Nigerian popular culture through these playing cards. Nigerians are influenced by their indigenous traditions but more increasingly by popular culture. Symbols of tradition—such as those that inspire these cards—are easily overshadowed by meanings, images and activities drawn from popular culture. Since popular culture is grounded in the mundane and the persistent routines of everyday life, then this history too becomes implicit and fixed. The old Africa that inspired these artifacts has now lost much of its luster. If Nigeria’s prosperous past becomes common sense through these cards, then perhaps the notion of a brighter future won’t be so far-fetched." - Olutade
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Lost Wax Playing Cards
By Olutade Abidoye
Each set of Lost Wax Playing Cards contains 54 playing cards featuring illustrations of royal figures from the 15th – 19th century Benin Empire. The Benin Empire thrived in what is now southern Nigeria and left an impressive record of their civilization in the form of bronze plaques commissioned by the King (Oba) to adorn the courtyards of his palace. The playing cards pay homage to this prosperous period in Nigerian history and, in effect, bring this bygone era from the archives into modernity in a colorful and playful way.
"I expect Lost Wax Playing Cards to bring a new dynamism to Nigerian popular culture and consciousness. My aim is to rekindle this colorful, yet elusive history into Nigerian popular culture through these playing cards. Nigerians are influenced by their indigenous traditions but more increasingly by popular culture. Symbols of tradition—such as those that inspire these cards—are easily overshadowed by meanings, images and activities drawn from popular culture. Since popular culture is grounded in the mundane and the persistent routines of everyday life, then this history too becomes implicit and fixed. The old Africa that inspired these artifacts has now lost much of its luster. If Nigeria’s prosperous past becomes common sense through these cards, then perhaps the notion of a brighter future won’t be so far-fetched." - Olutade
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Lost Wax Playing Cards
By Olutade Abidoye
Each set of Lost Wax Playing Cards contains 54 playing cards featuring illustrations of royal figures from the 15th – 19th century Benin Empire. The Benin Empire thrived in what is now southern Nigeria and left an impressive record of their civilization in the form of bronze plaques commissioned by the King (Oba) to adorn the courtyards of his palace. The playing cards pay homage to this prosperous period in Nigerian history and, in effect, bring this bygone era from the archives into modernity in a colorful and playful way.
"I expect Lost Wax Playing Cards to bring a new dynamism to Nigerian popular culture and consciousness. My aim is to rekindle this colorful, yet elusive history into Nigerian popular culture through these playing cards. Nigerians are influenced by their indigenous traditions but more increasingly by popular culture. Symbols of tradition—such as those that inspire these cards—are easily overshadowed by meanings, images and activities drawn from popular culture. Since popular culture is grounded in the mundane and the persistent routines of everyday life, then this history too becomes implicit and fixed. The old Africa that inspired these artifacts has now lost much of its luster. If Nigeria’s prosperous past becomes common sense through these cards, then perhaps the notion of a brighter future won’t be so far-fetched." - Olutade
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Lost Wax Playing Cards
By Olutade Abidoye
Each set of Lost Wax Playing Cards contains 54 playing cards featuring illustrations of royal figures from the 15th – 19th century Benin Empire. The Benin Empire thrived in what is now southern Nigeria and left an impressive record of their civilization in the form of bronze plaques commissioned by the King (Oba) to adorn the courtyards of his palace. The playing cards pay homage to this prosperous period in Nigerian history and, in effect, bring this bygone era from the archives into modernity in a colorful and playful way.
"I expect Lost Wax Playing Cards to bring a new dynamism to Nigerian popular culture and consciousness. My aim is to rekindle this colorful, yet elusive history into Nigerian popular culture through these playing cards. Nigerians are influenced by their indigenous traditions but more increasingly by popular culture. Symbols of tradition—such as those that inspire these cards—are easily overshadowed by meanings, images and activities drawn from popular culture. Since popular culture is grounded in the mundane and the persistent routines of everyday life, then this history too becomes implicit and fixed. The old Africa that inspired these artifacts has now lost much of its luster. If Nigeria’s prosperous past becomes common sense through these cards, then perhaps the notion of a brighter future won’t be so far-fetched." - Olutade
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Lost Wax Playing Cards
By Olutade Abidoye
Each set of Lost Wax Playing Cards contains 54 playing cards featuring illustrations of royal figures from the 15th – 19th century Benin Empire. The Benin Empire thrived in what is now southern Nigeria and left an impressive record of their civilization in the form of bronze plaques commissioned by the King (Oba) to adorn the courtyards of his palace. The playing cards pay homage to this prosperous period in Nigerian history and, in effect, bring this bygone era from the archives into modernity in a colorful and playful way.
"I expect Lost Wax Playing Cards to bring a new dynamism to Nigerian popular culture and consciousness. My aim is to rekindle this colorful, yet elusive history into Nigerian popular culture through these playing cards. Nigerians are influenced by their indigenous traditions but more increasingly by popular culture. Symbols of tradition—such as those that inspire these cards—are easily overshadowed by meanings, images and activities drawn from popular culture. Since popular culture is grounded in the mundane and the persistent routines of everyday life, then this history too becomes implicit and fixed. The old Africa that inspired these artifacts has now lost much of its luster. If Nigeria’s prosperous past becomes common sense through these cards, then perhaps the notion of a brighter future won’t be so far-fetched." - Olutade
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic