ACCRA [dot] ALT
Dope music. Fresh art. Brave Indie cultures. Subversively African
ACCRA [dot] ALT
+
30roundrevolution:

robotcosmonaut:

Jeremy Chambers

I wish I could reblog this a billion times
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kharumwa:

cow horn jeweller
kharumwa:

cow horn jeweller
kharumwa:

cow horn jeweller
kharumwa:

cow horn jeweller
kharumwa:

cow horn jeweller
NKENTEN_Pages_Obodai_2.pdf
+
soulbrotherv2:

The Mysterious Stone Kingdom of the Great Zimbabwe

By MRREESE
Zimbabwe is home to one of the most stunning historical monuments in Africa – the monument of the Great Zimbabwe.  Built 900 years ago, the massive stone structures of the Great Zimbabwe create a breathtaking view, leaving visitors to wonder about the historical events that transpired many centuries ago. How were these massive stone structures built? What kind of society lived here? Why was such an impressive and durable structure ultimately abandoned?
The name ‘Zimbabwe’ is an anglicized form of an African word meaning ‘stone houses’, for the ruins of the Great Zimbabwe are comprised of several stone walls, monuments, and buildings built mainly of granite. The structures were created using a method called dry stonewalling, which requires a high level of masonry expertise. The internal structure contains many passageways and enclosures. It spans almost 1800 acres of the southeastern area of the country of Zimbabwe. While it may seem that the structure was named after the country, it is actually the other way around. 
[Continue reading article at Ancient Origins.]
soulbrotherv2:

The Mysterious Stone Kingdom of the Great Zimbabwe

By MRREESE
Zimbabwe is home to one of the most stunning historical monuments in Africa – the monument of the Great Zimbabwe.  Built 900 years ago, the massive stone structures of the Great Zimbabwe create a breathtaking view, leaving visitors to wonder about the historical events that transpired many centuries ago. How were these massive stone structures built? What kind of society lived here? Why was such an impressive and durable structure ultimately abandoned?
The name ‘Zimbabwe’ is an anglicized form of an African word meaning ‘stone houses’, for the ruins of the Great Zimbabwe are comprised of several stone walls, monuments, and buildings built mainly of granite. The structures were created using a method called dry stonewalling, which requires a high level of masonry expertise. The internal structure contains many passageways and enclosures. It spans almost 1800 acres of the southeastern area of the country of Zimbabwe. While it may seem that the structure was named after the country, it is actually the other way around. 
[Continue reading article at Ancient Origins.]
soulbrotherv2:

The Mysterious Stone Kingdom of the Great Zimbabwe

By MRREESE
Zimbabwe is home to one of the most stunning historical monuments in Africa – the monument of the Great Zimbabwe.  Built 900 years ago, the massive stone structures of the Great Zimbabwe create a breathtaking view, leaving visitors to wonder about the historical events that transpired many centuries ago. How were these massive stone structures built? What kind of society lived here? Why was such an impressive and durable structure ultimately abandoned?
The name ‘Zimbabwe’ is an anglicized form of an African word meaning ‘stone houses’, for the ruins of the Great Zimbabwe are comprised of several stone walls, monuments, and buildings built mainly of granite. The structures were created using a method called dry stonewalling, which requires a high level of masonry expertise. The internal structure contains many passageways and enclosures. It spans almost 1800 acres of the southeastern area of the country of Zimbabwe. While it may seem that the structure was named after the country, it is actually the other way around. 
[Continue reading article at Ancient Origins.]
soulbrotherv2:

The Mysterious Stone Kingdom of the Great Zimbabwe

By MRREESE
Zimbabwe is home to one of the most stunning historical monuments in Africa – the monument of the Great Zimbabwe.  Built 900 years ago, the massive stone structures of the Great Zimbabwe create a breathtaking view, leaving visitors to wonder about the historical events that transpired many centuries ago. How were these massive stone structures built? What kind of society lived here? Why was such an impressive and durable structure ultimately abandoned?
The name ‘Zimbabwe’ is an anglicized form of an African word meaning ‘stone houses’, for the ruins of the Great Zimbabwe are comprised of several stone walls, monuments, and buildings built mainly of granite. The structures were created using a method called dry stonewalling, which requires a high level of masonry expertise. The internal structure contains many passageways and enclosures. It spans almost 1800 acres of the southeastern area of the country of Zimbabwe. While it may seem that the structure was named after the country, it is actually the other way around. 
[Continue reading article at Ancient Origins.]
+
nowinexile:

Palestinian artist Sabbah Iyad attempts to capture the events of the Shujaiya massacre that happened during the last war on Gaza with sculptures of families fleeing the inevitable death in their homes. 
More than 2,189 Palestinians were murdered during the latest Israeli war on Gaza. 
nowinexile:

Palestinian artist Sabbah Iyad attempts to capture the events of the Shujaiya massacre that happened during the last war on Gaza with sculptures of families fleeing the inevitable death in their homes. 
More than 2,189 Palestinians were murdered during the latest Israeli war on Gaza. 
nowinexile:

Palestinian artist Sabbah Iyad attempts to capture the events of the Shujaiya massacre that happened during the last war on Gaza with sculptures of families fleeing the inevitable death in their homes. 
More than 2,189 Palestinians were murdered during the latest Israeli war on Gaza. 
nowinexile:

Palestinian artist Sabbah Iyad attempts to capture the events of the Shujaiya massacre that happened during the last war on Gaza with sculptures of families fleeing the inevitable death in their homes. 
More than 2,189 Palestinians were murdered during the latest Israeli war on Gaza. 
nowinexile:

Palestinian artist Sabbah Iyad attempts to capture the events of the Shujaiya massacre that happened during the last war on Gaza with sculptures of families fleeing the inevitable death in their homes. 
More than 2,189 Palestinians were murdered during the latest Israeli war on Gaza. 
+
thirdorgan:

Szász Endre (Hungary, 1926-2003) 

12 kompozíció 1 lapon
+
beautiesofafrique:

darkgirlswirl:

beautiesofafrique:

Swahili women with henna 

this idea of calling people ‘Swahili’ is inaccurate, I’ve been told. Swahili is a language, not an ethnicity or a cultural identity marker.

Waswahili is the correct term but saying “Swahili person” or “Swahili woman” is fine
beautiesofafrique:

darkgirlswirl:

beautiesofafrique:

Swahili women with henna 

this idea of calling people ‘Swahili’ is inaccurate, I’ve been told. Swahili is a language, not an ethnicity or a cultural identity marker.

Waswahili is the correct term but saying “Swahili person” or “Swahili woman” is fine
beautiesofafrique:

darkgirlswirl:

beautiesofafrique:

Swahili women with henna 

this idea of calling people ‘Swahili’ is inaccurate, I’ve been told. Swahili is a language, not an ethnicity or a cultural identity marker.

Waswahili is the correct term but saying “Swahili person” or “Swahili woman” is fine
beautiesofafrique:

darkgirlswirl:

beautiesofafrique:

Swahili women with henna 

this idea of calling people ‘Swahili’ is inaccurate, I’ve been told. Swahili is a language, not an ethnicity or a cultural identity marker.

Waswahili is the correct term but saying “Swahili person” or “Swahili woman” is fine
beautiesofafrique:

darkgirlswirl:

beautiesofafrique:

Swahili women with henna 

this idea of calling people ‘Swahili’ is inaccurate, I’ve been told. Swahili is a language, not an ethnicity or a cultural identity marker.

Waswahili is the correct term but saying “Swahili person” or “Swahili woman” is fine
beautiesofafrique:

darkgirlswirl:

beautiesofafrique:

Swahili women with henna 

this idea of calling people ‘Swahili’ is inaccurate, I’ve been told. Swahili is a language, not an ethnicity or a cultural identity marker.

Waswahili is the correct term but saying “Swahili person” or “Swahili woman” is fine
beautiesofafrique:

darkgirlswirl:

beautiesofafrique:

Swahili women with henna 

this idea of calling people ‘Swahili’ is inaccurate, I’ve been told. Swahili is a language, not an ethnicity or a cultural identity marker.

Waswahili is the correct term but saying “Swahili person” or “Swahili woman” is fine
beautiesofafrique:

darkgirlswirl:

beautiesofafrique:

Swahili women with henna 

this idea of calling people ‘Swahili’ is inaccurate, I’ve been told. Swahili is a language, not an ethnicity or a cultural identity marker.

Waswahili is the correct term but saying “Swahili person” or “Swahili woman” is fine
beautiesofafrique:

darkgirlswirl:

beautiesofafrique:

Swahili women with henna 

this idea of calling people ‘Swahili’ is inaccurate, I’ve been told. Swahili is a language, not an ethnicity or a cultural identity marker.

Waswahili is the correct term but saying “Swahili person” or “Swahili woman” is fine
beautiesofafrique:

darkgirlswirl:

beautiesofafrique:

Swahili women with henna 

this idea of calling people ‘Swahili’ is inaccurate, I’ve been told. Swahili is a language, not an ethnicity or a cultural identity marker.

Waswahili is the correct term but saying “Swahili person” or “Swahili woman” is fine
+
beautiesofafrique:

darkgirlswirl:

beautiesofafrique:

Swahili women with henna 

this idea of calling people ‘Swahili’ is inaccurate, I’ve been told. Swahili is a language, not an ethnicity or a cultural identity marker.

Waswahili is the correct term but saying “Swahili person” or “Swahili woman” is fine
beautiesofafrique:

darkgirlswirl:

beautiesofafrique:

Swahili women with henna 

this idea of calling people ‘Swahili’ is inaccurate, I’ve been told. Swahili is a language, not an ethnicity or a cultural identity marker.

Waswahili is the correct term but saying “Swahili person” or “Swahili woman” is fine
beautiesofafrique:

darkgirlswirl:

beautiesofafrique:

Swahili women with henna 

this idea of calling people ‘Swahili’ is inaccurate, I’ve been told. Swahili is a language, not an ethnicity or a cultural identity marker.

Waswahili is the correct term but saying “Swahili person” or “Swahili woman” is fine
beautiesofafrique:

darkgirlswirl:

beautiesofafrique:

Swahili women with henna 

this idea of calling people ‘Swahili’ is inaccurate, I’ve been told. Swahili is a language, not an ethnicity or a cultural identity marker.

Waswahili is the correct term but saying “Swahili person” or “Swahili woman” is fine
beautiesofafrique:

darkgirlswirl:

beautiesofafrique:

Swahili women with henna 

this idea of calling people ‘Swahili’ is inaccurate, I’ve been told. Swahili is a language, not an ethnicity or a cultural identity marker.

Waswahili is the correct term but saying “Swahili person” or “Swahili woman” is fine
beautiesofafrique:

darkgirlswirl:

beautiesofafrique:

Swahili women with henna 

this idea of calling people ‘Swahili’ is inaccurate, I’ve been told. Swahili is a language, not an ethnicity or a cultural identity marker.

Waswahili is the correct term but saying “Swahili person” or “Swahili woman” is fine
beautiesofafrique:

darkgirlswirl:

beautiesofafrique:

Swahili women with henna 

this idea of calling people ‘Swahili’ is inaccurate, I’ve been told. Swahili is a language, not an ethnicity or a cultural identity marker.

Waswahili is the correct term but saying “Swahili person” or “Swahili woman” is fine
beautiesofafrique:

darkgirlswirl:

beautiesofafrique:

Swahili women with henna 

this idea of calling people ‘Swahili’ is inaccurate, I’ve been told. Swahili is a language, not an ethnicity or a cultural identity marker.

Waswahili is the correct term but saying “Swahili person” or “Swahili woman” is fine
beautiesofafrique:

darkgirlswirl:

beautiesofafrique:

Swahili women with henna 

this idea of calling people ‘Swahili’ is inaccurate, I’ve been told. Swahili is a language, not an ethnicity or a cultural identity marker.

Waswahili is the correct term but saying “Swahili person” or “Swahili woman” is fine
beautiesofafrique:

darkgirlswirl:

beautiesofafrique:

Swahili women with henna 

this idea of calling people ‘Swahili’ is inaccurate, I’ve been told. Swahili is a language, not an ethnicity or a cultural identity marker.

Waswahili is the correct term but saying “Swahili person” or “Swahili woman” is fine
+
euthanizeallwhitepeople:

la-malcriada:

darkjez:

nia-ebadu:

throughsanaseyes:

nevermindreal:

4eva reblog

US

This should have a million notes… we can sit and reblog a bunch of weed post (that gets almost up to 60,000 notes) but we cant reblog something REAL like this.

OWN YOUR HISTORY WHITE FOLKS

Never fucking forget what they did.

White history.
euthanizeallwhitepeople:

la-malcriada:

darkjez:

nia-ebadu:

throughsanaseyes:

nevermindreal:

4eva reblog

US

This should have a million notes… we can sit and reblog a bunch of weed post (that gets almost up to 60,000 notes) but we cant reblog something REAL like this.

OWN YOUR HISTORY WHITE FOLKS

Never fucking forget what they did.

White history.
+
cecileemeke:

Support the #StrollingSeries (See full discussion HERE)
We want to take strolling everywhere: Stockholm, Kampala, Brooklyn, Lisbon, Buenos Aires, Berlin, Paris, Lagos, Accra, Moscow, Sydney, Addis Ababa, Dubai, Beijing, Miami, Kingston, Castries  - everywhere.
We want to give a voice to ordinary people of the diaspora. If you want to support us in making this a reality, please donate: http://donate.cecileemeke.com
Strolling: Connecting the scattered stories of the global African/Black Diaspora.
Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Soundcloud | Vimeo | Youtube
cecileemeke:

Support the #StrollingSeries (See full discussion HERE)
We want to take strolling everywhere: Stockholm, Kampala, Brooklyn, Lisbon, Buenos Aires, Berlin, Paris, Lagos, Accra, Moscow, Sydney, Addis Ababa, Dubai, Beijing, Miami, Kingston, Castries  - everywhere.
We want to give a voice to ordinary people of the diaspora. If you want to support us in making this a reality, please donate: http://donate.cecileemeke.com
Strolling: Connecting the scattered stories of the global African/Black Diaspora.
Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Soundcloud | Vimeo | Youtube
cecileemeke:

Support the #StrollingSeries (See full discussion HERE)
We want to take strolling everywhere: Stockholm, Kampala, Brooklyn, Lisbon, Buenos Aires, Berlin, Paris, Lagos, Accra, Moscow, Sydney, Addis Ababa, Dubai, Beijing, Miami, Kingston, Castries  - everywhere.
We want to give a voice to ordinary people of the diaspora. If you want to support us in making this a reality, please donate: http://donate.cecileemeke.com
Strolling: Connecting the scattered stories of the global African/Black Diaspora.
Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Soundcloud | Vimeo | Youtube
cecileemeke:

Support the #StrollingSeries (See full discussion HERE)
We want to take strolling everywhere: Stockholm, Kampala, Brooklyn, Lisbon, Buenos Aires, Berlin, Paris, Lagos, Accra, Moscow, Sydney, Addis Ababa, Dubai, Beijing, Miami, Kingston, Castries  - everywhere.
We want to give a voice to ordinary people of the diaspora. If you want to support us in making this a reality, please donate: http://donate.cecileemeke.com
Strolling: Connecting the scattered stories of the global African/Black Diaspora.
Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Soundcloud | Vimeo | Youtube
cecileemeke:

Support the #StrollingSeries (See full discussion HERE)
We want to take strolling everywhere: Stockholm, Kampala, Brooklyn, Lisbon, Buenos Aires, Berlin, Paris, Lagos, Accra, Moscow, Sydney, Addis Ababa, Dubai, Beijing, Miami, Kingston, Castries  - everywhere.
We want to give a voice to ordinary people of the diaspora. If you want to support us in making this a reality, please donate: http://donate.cecileemeke.com
Strolling: Connecting the scattered stories of the global African/Black Diaspora.
Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Soundcloud | Vimeo | Youtube
cecileemeke:

Support the #StrollingSeries (See full discussion HERE)
We want to take strolling everywhere: Stockholm, Kampala, Brooklyn, Lisbon, Buenos Aires, Berlin, Paris, Lagos, Accra, Moscow, Sydney, Addis Ababa, Dubai, Beijing, Miami, Kingston, Castries  - everywhere.
We want to give a voice to ordinary people of the diaspora. If you want to support us in making this a reality, please donate: http://donate.cecileemeke.com
Strolling: Connecting the scattered stories of the global African/Black Diaspora.
Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Soundcloud | Vimeo | Youtube
cecileemeke:

Support the #StrollingSeries (See full discussion HERE)
We want to take strolling everywhere: Stockholm, Kampala, Brooklyn, Lisbon, Buenos Aires, Berlin, Paris, Lagos, Accra, Moscow, Sydney, Addis Ababa, Dubai, Beijing, Miami, Kingston, Castries  - everywhere.
We want to give a voice to ordinary people of the diaspora. If you want to support us in making this a reality, please donate: http://donate.cecileemeke.com
Strolling: Connecting the scattered stories of the global African/Black Diaspora.
Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Soundcloud | Vimeo | Youtube
cecileemeke:

Support the #StrollingSeries (See full discussion HERE)
We want to take strolling everywhere: Stockholm, Kampala, Brooklyn, Lisbon, Buenos Aires, Berlin, Paris, Lagos, Accra, Moscow, Sydney, Addis Ababa, Dubai, Beijing, Miami, Kingston, Castries  - everywhere.
We want to give a voice to ordinary people of the diaspora. If you want to support us in making this a reality, please donate: http://donate.cecileemeke.com
Strolling: Connecting the scattered stories of the global African/Black Diaspora.
Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Soundcloud | Vimeo | Youtube
+
art-and-things-of-beauty:

Arthur Frederick Bridgman(1847-1928) - The ceremony of the Acharya in Blida in Algeria, oil on canvas, 118,5 x 162 cm. 
art-and-things-of-beauty:

Arthur Frederick Bridgman(1847-1928) - The ceremony of the Acharya in Blida in Algeria, oil on canvas, 118,5 x 162 cm. 
art-and-things-of-beauty:

Arthur Frederick Bridgman(1847-1928) - The ceremony of the Acharya in Blida in Algeria, oil on canvas, 118,5 x 162 cm. 
How an African slave helped Boston fight smallpox - The Boston Globe
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salahmah:

 The Lynching of Young Blacks [Indiana, 1930]


This photograph was taken after the lynching of two young black men accused of raping a white girl. They were hanged by a mob of 10,000. The faces of the crowd are very telling. A third man was saved by the girls uncle who said he was innocent.

America has a long deep history of brutality against people of color.
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fnhfal:

 National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA) - Angolan Civil War 


Better is coming still.
+
imazighenstateofmind:

Ancient Imazighen town of Ghadames, Libya by Eric Lafforgue
imazighenstateofmind:

Ancient Imazighen town of Ghadames, Libya by Eric Lafforgue
imazighenstateofmind:

Ancient Imazighen town of Ghadames, Libya by Eric Lafforgue
imazighenstateofmind:

Ancient Imazighen town of Ghadames, Libya by Eric Lafforgue
imazighenstateofmind:

Ancient Imazighen town of Ghadames, Libya by Eric Lafforgue
imazighenstateofmind:

Ancient Imazighen town of Ghadames, Libya by Eric Lafforgue
imazighenstateofmind:

Ancient Imazighen town of Ghadames, Libya by Eric Lafforgue
imazighenstateofmind:

Ancient Imazighen town of Ghadames, Libya by Eric Lafforgue
imazighenstateofmind:

Ancient Imazighen town of Ghadames, Libya by Eric Lafforgue
imazighenstateofmind:

Ancient Imazighen town of Ghadames, Libya by Eric Lafforgue